Saxon life, escapee kids and Stone Age painting

Butser Ancient Farm near Petersfield will open seven days a week from the Easter weekend.  The farm currently has 17 lambs and six baby goats frolicking amongst the roundhouses; the kids are quite the escape artists so you never know where they’re likely to pop up.

Over the Easter weekend Anglo Saxon re-enactment group Herigeas Hundas will be greeting the spring and making the farm their home with demonstrations, traditional crafts, cooking and fighting. The group will be showing visitors what life would have been like in 5th to 7th century Hampshire with the backdrop of the farm’s Saxon Long Hall. Families can get a further taste for Saxon life by following the farm’s spring trail to find and translate Saxon runes and reveal a secret message.  

 Each day of the holidays there’s also the chance to get hands on with some DIY archaeology experiments, from making mosaics to Stone Age painting, and to learn more about the farm and archaeology with ten-minute taster talks. On Wednesdays visitors will have the chance to learn the art of felting and create something special to take home.

Visitors to Butser Ancient Farm over Easter will also get a sneak preview of the construction of this year’s giant 30ft wicker man for the farm’s Beltain festival on May 5.  The wicker man design changes every year and is only revealed on the night of the festival where it is ceremonially burned to welcome in the summer months.

See www.butserancientfarm.co.uk

CHURCHER’S – YOU ROCK!

REVIEW – School of Rock

Churcher’s College, Petersfield

Wednesday, April 21

Churcher’s pupils proved they are Petersfield’s School of Rock, as they air-guitared and fist-pumped their way through this musical.

Based on the Linklater film starring Jack Black, the stage show of School of Rock was created by Andrew Lloyd-Webber and Julian Fellowes (yes, of Downton Abbey fame – who’d have thought??)  Different music to the film but the plot is the same – eternal slacker Dewey, kicked out of his band and kipping at his friend Ned’s place, is a failed wannabe rock star. He’s broke, he can’t get into Battle of the Bands and he’s definitely not flavour of the month with Ned’s girlfriend as he hasn’t paid the rent yet again.

Oliver Fogelin as Dewey is engaging and talented; I suspect, not at all a slacker in real life. Great performance.
In the show, Dewey pretends to be Ned, a supply teacher, and takes a job at a smart prep school which prides itself on tradition, discipline and academic success. Dewey shocks the pupils with his don’t care attitude to grades and timetables and he’s on his way to being found out when he discovers the children are musically gifted. He teaches them rock history, swaps the cello for a bass and piano for some prog keyboards and hey presto – he has a band!

In the process of course, he gives them the freedom to express their feelings. The boy who likes Streisand, reads Vogue and is oppressed by his football-mad dad, gets to be the band’s stylist (Jackson Wilks – take a bow; you are superb). The girl who never speaks proves to have a golden singing voice (Milly Greenall – well done!). Zack whose dad wants him to be an academic success so he doesn’t get stuck in a poorly-paid job just wants to be a rock guitarist (Roscoe Davey – devil’s horns to you, sir).

There’s a very moving song from the children in the first act, where they explain the pressure they’re under from parents. If Only You Would Listen is a plea to be seen and heard, and I had a lump in my throat when these diminutive lower school pupils turned to the audience and showed their vulnerability in the song.

The big, catchy number is Stick It to the Man – the rock anthem in which Dewey teaches the kids to break out and rebel.  What do you do when “parents overwork ya” or they’re “all up in your Facebook” or make you eat “gluten-free vegan snack foods”? You “stick it to the man”, the man being your parents, your teacher, your boss… any figure of authority preventing you from being yourself. It was lovely watching the kids let go and leap around the stage. It left everyone smiling and humming the tune in the interval.

Of course, the children aren’t the only ones who are trapped in their lives, needing rock to free them. As the put-upon Ned, Harry Marden has the audience’s sympathy, waiting until his girlfriend Patty (played with confidence by Ruby Hall) is out of the house, before playing Guitar Hero and rocking out on the sofa.

Matilda Shapland plays the head teacher Miss Mullins, who needs to take off her specs and indulge her passion for Stevie Nicks (I loved the little scene as she hums along to Fleetwood Mac on her headphones in her office). Her Queen of the Night aria in the music class was incredible – Matilda has starred in West End musicals and it’s easy to see why from this performance.

There were so many fantastic performances in this show – from the band perched above the stage to the smallest of the performers rocking out front. It’s a big, warm-hearted show about freedom of expression – and Churcher’s totally nailed it.

Well done director and choreographer Stacey Carty, musical director Helen Purchase, production manager Chris Pellet and the many, many backstage crew and enthusiastic cast. You rock!

Kat Wootton

St Ives School grounds given a spring makeover

St Ives School in Haslemere saw children, staff and parents come together for a ground force afternoon last week. They worked together to weed, clear, sweep, plant and decorate the school surroundings and took great pride in adding their own special touch to the grounds of the school.

The afternoon allowed children to work in mixed groups to take responsibility for the upkeep of the school grounds. This was achieved by completing activities such as pebble decorating, planting herbs, sewing wild flower seeds and re-planting hanging baskets. Of course there was a much needed rest mid-way through the afternoon for a drink and a biscuit for the busy bees!

It was fantastic to see the whole school getting stuck in with the community project, (including the Nursery children and staff), as well as children working alongside their friends and relatives to further improve their school surroundings.

St Ives would like to thank Haslemere Garden Centre and Squires Garden Centre for supporting the ground force afternoon.

Colourful show as St Nick’s takes on Joseph

St Nicholas’ School in Church Crookham put on a  colourful performance recently. The senior production was Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat, with music by Andrew Lloyd Webber and lyrics by Tim Rice.

A West End favourite, Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat is a family musical about the trials and triumphs of Joseph, Israel’s favourite son.

With a wonderfully diverse musical score and a cast and crew of nearly 60 pupils, supported by a ten-piece band, this high-energy production was indeed a truly colourful event.  There was a dazzling array of spectacular costumes including, of course, “the coat!”

The show was great fun for all the performers, with music ranging from the Country and Western style of  One more Angel to the rocking 50s Elvis pastiche of Song of the King.

Senior pupils Catherine Harris, who played Joseph, and Charlotte Hutchinson and Jessica Phillips, who were the Narrators, were outstanding in their roles, showing great stamina, vocal quality and stage presence.

Director and Head of Drama Josie Downer said: “Everyone has worked so hard and it is very rewarding seeing the girls put on such a slick and thoroughly professional production.”

Churcher’s Juniors take a look round Number 10

Year 6 at Churcher’s Junior School were lucky enough to see what lies behind the famous black door at Number 10 recently.  The visit to Downing Street was part of their Citizenship Week.

After posing on the front step, the children were welcomed into the Cabinet Room.  The children sat round the famous green table, some even having the opportunity to sit in the Prime Minister’s chair!  They learnt all about some of the important decisions that have affected British life, made and discussed in this historic room.

Next they walked up the Grand Staircase installed by Sir Robert Walpole when he took up residence as Prime Minister in 1735, past portraits of previous Prime Ministers including Churchill, McMillan and Blair.

They then entered the study; a favourite place for Margaret Thatcher and David Cameron to work. Now it hosts the table used for the G8 meeting held in Ireland in 2013; perhaps there is a future world leader in this class?

By entering the White Drawing Room and Terracotta Room, Year 6 joined the many international VIPs that have graced Downing Street.  Here they posed for diplomatic handshakes in front of the White Room’s beautiful  fireplace.

The highlight of the trip for the children, was to see and stroke Larry the cat who was sleeping on the window sill in the hallway.  As the resident mouser, he certainly looked happy and well fed.

Mrs Sarah Roberts, class teacher said: “It was a remarkable experience for us all.  We have been studying the power of democracy and parliament and to visit this place so entwined with British government and British history was a very memorable experience.  I was very proud of my class, whose behaviour was excellent.”

Churcher’s pupils STEAM in to Southampton for art day

The Year 4 children from Churcher’s College Junior School visited Southampton Art Gallery this week as part of their STEAM week work.

After a brief gallery tour they enjoyed a workshop with Jo, one of the museum’s resident artists. She gently guided the children through making a Medusa head out of clay- complete with writhing snakes for hair. This activity linked in with the work they have been doing this term in History on the Ancient Greeks.

With this in mind, the pupils were very anxious to see the Perseus room at the gallery, which exhibits 12 enormous paintings by Edward Burne-Jones depicting the famous legend. This trip is always fun and worthwhile and for many, it is their very first experience of an Art Gallery.

Annual U-11 football tournament hosted by Churcher’s Juniors

Churcher’s College Junior School hosted their annual U11 7 a-side Football Tournament and with 11 teams taking part the stage was set for a fantastic event – it didn’t disappoint!

With a total of 55 matches being played in a round robin format, the podium placed teams changed on regular occasion and going into the final round there were 4 teams in contention for the win.In the end it came down to the CCJS A Team beating Alton School in their final match to confirm Prince’s Mead as the overall winners with Churcher’s in second place and St Edmunds in third.

Churcher’s A team turned up ready to play a tough tournament but one that they knew they could win, having beaten almost every other team recently. The first match was against PGS and we came through well with a win, then came Oakwood where we experienced our first loss. As the games came through we went through a rollercoaster of emotions and results, winning or drawing most of our games we weren’t making our lives easy. Then came Churcher’s B, rivals and classmates all on the same pitch, it was going to be a good game and it didn’t disappoint, although under a huge amount of pressure Churcher’s B defended in numbers and defended well, with Churcher’s A unable to fine the net it ended 0-0. After a final few games Churcher’s A had given it everything, and due to earlier results, they now were reliant on other results elsewhere.

With the games ended it was up to Mr Forbes to announce the results, as the other teams were announced it came down to two and Churcher’s A had achieved a well-deserved second place. Well done to all the teams who took part.

St Ives school shortlisted for TES award

St Ives school shortlisted for TES award

St Ives School in Haslemere has been shortlisted for the independent pre-prep/prep school of the year award at the prestigious 2018 Tes Independent School Awards.

“This is a huge accolade as we are one of only eight schools nominated, with competition from some of the finest and most respected of the country’s 620 independent prep schools,” said head teacher Mrs Kay Goldsworthy.

“The nomination recognises the success of St Ives, not only in academic achievement but also innovation, imagination and efforts to develop children in ways that go beyond the league tables.

“We are of course extremely proud of the high academic standards of our pupils, in a non-selective environment, but we recognise that this represents only part of developing the whole child. The breadth of wider experiences offered at St Ives allows all our children to develop as individuals, to grow a general life-long love of learning and to naturally achieve and progress. This was evident in 50% scholarships to senior schools, 34 distinctions and five merits in Verse & Prose / Acting exams, qualification for the IAPS swimming and coming second in the National United Ideas invention competition.”

Ann Mroz, Editor of Tes (formerly known as the Times Educational Supplement), said: “Independent education in this country is world class. It’s one of Britain’s great success stories. And those shortlisted for the TES Independent School Awards are the cream of the crop. This year we had more entries than ever, the standard was the best yet and the competition fiercer than ever before.  To be shortlisted is an extraordinary achievement.”

St Ives Chair of Governors, Graham Harvey-Browne, said: “We are delighted and very proud to hear this wonderful news.  This is a testament to the dedication and hard work of Mrs Goldsworthy, Miss Smith and all of the teaching and support staff at St Ives, and is a clear indicator of the continued success of the school in producing well-rounded young people who are inspired and supported in achieving their potential.”

St Ives’ broad curriculum is enriched and enhanced by an array of activities and events which have provided good reason for nomination for this award; its Forest School, educational visits, focus on local community and whole school charity days are just a few examples of how it aims to broaden the perspective of pupils and develop the whole child.

Mrs Goldsworthy added: “At St Ives we provide opportunities for each child to discover, develop and showcase their individual interests and talents whether that be in music, art, sport or other areas. In this way, we provide a truly nurturing and inspiring environment.”

St Ives School, Three Gates Lane, Haslemere

01428 643734

stiveshaslemere.com

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

Do the maths – Alton College students can!

Lucy Bayliss, previously at Amery Hill School and Sara Garanito, previously at Calthorpe Park School took part in this year’s Mathematical Olympiad for Girls. Over 1700 girls nationwide participated, with the top 25% receiving a Certificate of Distinction. The Mathematical Olympiad for Girls is an event run by the UK Mathematics Trust, introduced in 2011 to help schools and college nurture the talent of enthusiastic young female mathematicians. Sara received a Certificate of Participation and Lucy a Certificate of Distinction getting 10/10 for one of the questions (*below).

100 Maths students recently competed in the Senior Maths Challenge with nine achieving a gold award, 31 a silver award and 29 a bronze. Roughly 55,000 students nationally took the Challenge this year, a significant drop on previous years, but there was an increase in participants from Alton College. The Senior Maths Challenge consists of 25 very difficult non-calculator multiple-choice maths questions to be completed in 90 minutes. Students start with 25 marks, get four marks for each correct answer and lose one mark for each incorrect answer, to discourage guessing. See http://www.ukmt.org.uk/individual-competitions/senior-challenge/ for more information about the Challenge, along with the paper and solutions.

Pictured left to right: Lucy Bayliss, Dr Dave Lynch Curriculum Manager for Maths, Sara Garanito

The College’s top scorer was PeterMorris, previously at Eggar’s School; he scored 109 out of 125 which means he goes through to the British Maths Olympiad Round 1 (BMO1). Only the top 1,000 students in the country qualify for the BMO1. A further nine students have got through to the Senior Kangaroo (SK) round, which involves the next 6,000 best students, who don’t qualify for the BMO1.
They are:
Harry Buchanan, previously at Perins School
Lucy Bayliss, previously at Amery Hill School
James Dedman, previously home educated
Marco Li, previously educated overseas
Cameron Neasom, previously at Bohunt School
Rebekah Aspinwall, previously at Amery Hill School
Sam Bishop, previously at St Edmund’s School
James Macmillan Clyne, previously at Bohunt School
Joe Parry, previously at The Petersfield School
Three examples of this year’s challenge are (an easy, medium and hard question):
Q2:  Last year, an earthworm from Wigan named Dave wriggled into the record books as the largest found in the UK.
Dave was 40cm long and had a mass of 26g. What was Dave’s mass per unit length?
A: 0.6 g/cm       B: 0.65 g/cm      C: 0.75 g/cm      D: 1.6 g/cm       E: 1.75 g/cm

 

Q11:  The teenagers Sam and Jo notice the following facts about their ages:
The difference between the squares of their ages is four times the sum of their ages.
The sum of their ages is eight times the difference between their ages.
What is the age of the older of the two?
A: 15                 B: 16                 C: 17                  D: 18                 E: 19

Q24:  There is a set of straight lines in a plane such that each line intersects exactly ten others.
Which of the following could not be the number of lines in that set?
A: 11                 B: 12                 C: 15                  D: 16                 E: 20

Answers are B, D and D.

The question Lucy got totally correct:
Let n be an odd integer greater than 3 and let M = n2 + 2n − 7.
Prove that, for all such n, at least four different positive integers (excluding 1 and M) divide M exactly.

SaveSave

Music masterclass at King Edward’s Witley

Pupils at King Edward’s Witley were treated to an exceptional learning opportunity when Alexandra Vaduva, the celebrated pianist, delivered a music masterclass to pupils in Years 9-11. The inspiring coaching, followed by a short recital to students and staff, was made possible by the generosity of The Countess of Munster Musical Trust, founded by The Countess of Munster, a concert pianist herself, to support young musicians of professional calibre to achieve their aims.

Romanian-born Miss Vaduva started playing the piano at the age of four and has performed all over the world, winning numerous accolades, including first prize at the ‘Vienna International’, ‘Pro Piano’ and ‘Carl Filtsch’ International piano competitions. After completing a Bachelor of Music, Master of Arts and Advanced Diploma courses at the Royal Academy of Music Miss Vaduva is now studying for a PhD there. After spending time sharing her skills and knowledge with the pupils, Miss Vaduva’s recital, which took place in the School’s Recital Room, included Kinderszenen by Schumann; two sonatas by Scarlatti and a Suite by Bartók and concluded with Beethoven’s Moonlight Sonata.

Commenting on the special occasion, Stasio Sliwka, King Edward’s Director of Music, said: “It has been a huge privilege for our pupils to be afforded the opportunity to spend time with the incredibly talented Miss Vaduva, and indeed for the whole school to have the chance to attend such a rousing performance. The school enjoys a special relationship with The Countess of Munster Musical Trust, as the Countess kindly financed the building of our Music School which bears her name, and which she personally opened on 29 May 1963. Music has always played a central role in school life at King Edward’s and we remain committed to offering musical tuition of the highest calibre to enable our pupils to maximise their potential. As a result, we regularly welcome talented professionals to inspire our pupils with their talents – indeed the first performance in our Recital Room more than 50 years ago was given by world-class violinist Yehudi Menuhin accompanied by his pianist sister Hephzibah.”

Alexandra Vaduva with King Edward’s pupils at the Masterclass