Inventors – your chance to win £31,000 of help from Petersfield company!

Could you do with £31,000 of expert help to get your invention to market? The Morgan Innovation Prize 2019 is open for entries.

The judges are searching for innovators who believe their ideas will have a positive global impact by dramatically improving lives.

The prize is run by Morgan Innovation and Technology, an inventions company based in Petersfield, with 31 years of experience in designing, developing and manufacturing brilliant ideas.

The winner will receive research and development (R&D), production and marketing help to the value of £31,000 from Morgan IAT’s specialist team.

“We know from our own experiences that practical help and support can often be more valuable to an early-stage inventor than cash, so we decided the prize should be made up of R&D and manufacturing services to ensure we deliver a tangible benefit to the winner,” said CEO Nigel Clarke.

Morgan IAT has a real passion for innovation and a strong desire to be an enabler in bridging the gap between inventors having a great idea and being able to bring it to market.

The Morgan IAT Prize was launched in 2017/18 to celebrate Morgan IAT’s 30th anniversary and received 87 fantastic entries.

Last year’s winner Arslan Khalid is currently working with the team on his life-changing invention to detect disease by using a smartphone to profile a single droplet of blood.

Jon Bentley of the Gadget Show will be returning as a judge for the MIAT Prize 2019, along with business experts from Santander, solicitors Moore Blatch, Menzies accountants and East Hampshire District Council. Morgan IAT chairman Sue Clarke and Design Engineer Rajiv Linge will also be judges.

Jon said: “I’m excited to help judge an award that fosters innovation and harnesses creativity to generate ground-breaking visionary products.”

Morgan IAT invests 20% of turnover every year into helping inventors turn their ideas into reality. It has a first-class record in the medical, defence and commercial industries and won The Queen’s Award for Enterprise in International Trade in 2011 and 2016. Its prize-winning Salurate test for pre-eclampsia is out to user trials overseas.

To enter the MIAT Prize for the chance to win £31,000 worth of R&D visit http://www.miatprize.co.uk/. Entry is free and open until November 11. The MIAT Prize will be awarded to the entry which satisfies the judging panel that it has real commercial potential to change people’s lives for the better. Entrants must be UK residents.

Synchro club really in the swim – with medals galore!

It has been another successful year for Portsmouth and District Synchronised Swimming Club which trains at three pools – Churcher’s College in Petersfield, Redwood Park Academy in Cosham, and Fleming Park Leisure Centre in Eastleigh.

The club entered four teams into the National Synchro Combo Cup at the London Aquatic Centre on July 7. The 13-15 team won silver medals in their age category for the second year running.

Picture by Allan McKenzie – Swim England Synchro Combo Cup – London Aquatics Centre, London, England – clockwise from back left: Eloise Coath, Isabella Clarke, Breanna Neill, Tia Tattersall, Marianne Shaul, Isabelle Jupe, Jasmine Pitchford and Vianne Spiller

The 15-18 team came fifth in their age category (missing out on a medal by 0.1667).

The 12 and Under team were placed 16th and the 15 and Under team were placed 14th in their age categories.

Then on September 22 it was pretty much a clean sweep of the medal table at the SE Regionals for Portsmouth and District Synchro Club. The club dominated the top 12 places in the 13-18 figures with Isabel Benson, Emily Jupe and Marianne Shaul winning the gold, silver and bronze medals respectively.

The 15-18 team won gold medals too for their routine to “That Man” by Caro Emerald.

If you would be interested in trying synchronised swimming send an email to portsmouthanddistrictsynchro@hotmail.co.uk

The club is recruiting new swimmers to start beginner sessions at Redwood Park Academy on a Saturday morning between 9.30am and 11.30am.

The 13-15 team won gold medals for their routine to “Go West”.
Clockwise from top left Emily Jupe, Megan Lee, Lauren Shaul, Isabel Benson, Hazel Lee, Lauren Philp, Saffron Finch, Abby Mitchell and Beth Birch

Anglo Saxons to invade Chalton for Equinox celebration

Anglo Saxon re-enactment group, Herigeas Hundas, will be celebrating the Autumnal Equinox this weekend, September 22-23, at Butser Ancient Farm in Chalton.

Visitors will be able to enjoy action-packed fighting demonstrations, along with ancient crafts and everyday camp life at the farm’s Saxon long hall, throughout the weekend.

Group leader Rich Bonner said: “We are excited to be celebrating the Autumn Equinox at Butser Ancient Farm. It is a unique experience to be able to show the public what life would have been like in 5th to 7th century Hampshire with the inspiring backdrop of a Saxon long hall.

“Our warriors are ready to show off their fighting skills to visitors and we’re looking forward to demonstrating everyday aspects of camp life, from blacksmithing to ancient crafts and skills.”

“The Hundas musicians will also be practising their story telling and warming up their ancient musical instruments ready to celebrate the change in seasons.”

Herigeas Hundas portray the early pagan Anglo Saxon period of British history and are at Butser Ancient Farm for several weekends over the year.

Butser Ancient Farm’s Creative Developer, Rachel Bingham said: “It is always brilliant having Herigeas Hundas take up residence at the farm. They put on a fantastic display bringing our Saxon Hall to life and it is wonderful that they will be celebrating a traditional autumn equinox here at Butser.”

Butser Ancient Farm offers a unique experimental archaeology site nestled into the rolling countryside of the South Downs National Park and features reconstructions of Stone Age, Iron Age, Roman Britain and the Anglo-Saxon period.

Butser Ancient Farm will soon be closing at the weekends for the winter season, so this is the last chance to see the Herigeas Hundas Saxons in action.

See www.butserancientfarm.co.uk or http://www.hampshirereenactment.com to find out more

Saxon life, escapee kids and Stone Age painting

Butser Ancient Farm near Petersfield will open seven days a week from the Easter weekend.  The farm currently has 17 lambs and six baby goats frolicking amongst the roundhouses; the kids are quite the escape artists so you never know where they’re likely to pop up.

Over the Easter weekend Anglo Saxon re-enactment group Herigeas Hundas will be greeting the spring and making the farm their home with demonstrations, traditional crafts, cooking and fighting. The group will be showing visitors what life would have been like in 5th to 7th century Hampshire with the backdrop of the farm’s Saxon Long Hall. Families can get a further taste for Saxon life by following the farm’s spring trail to find and translate Saxon runes and reveal a secret message.  

 Each day of the holidays there’s also the chance to get hands on with some DIY archaeology experiments, from making mosaics to Stone Age painting, and to learn more about the farm and archaeology with ten-minute taster talks. On Wednesdays visitors will have the chance to learn the art of felting and create something special to take home.

Visitors to Butser Ancient Farm over Easter will also get a sneak preview of the construction of this year’s giant 30ft wicker man for the farm’s Beltain festival on May 5.  The wicker man design changes every year and is only revealed on the night of the festival where it is ceremonially burned to welcome in the summer months.

See www.butserancientfarm.co.uk

CHURCHER’S – YOU ROCK!

REVIEW – School of Rock

Churcher’s College, Petersfield

Wednesday, April 21

Churcher’s pupils proved they are Petersfield’s School of Rock, as they air-guitared and fist-pumped their way through this musical.

Based on the Linklater film starring Jack Black, the stage show of School of Rock was created by Andrew Lloyd-Webber and Julian Fellowes (yes, of Downton Abbey fame – who’d have thought??)  Different music to the film but the plot is the same – eternal slacker Dewey, kicked out of his band and kipping at his friend Ned’s place, is a failed wannabe rock star. He’s broke, he can’t get into Battle of the Bands and he’s definitely not flavour of the month with Ned’s girlfriend as he hasn’t paid the rent yet again.

Oliver Fogelin as Dewey is engaging and talented; I suspect, not at all a slacker in real life. Great performance.
In the show, Dewey pretends to be Ned, a supply teacher, and takes a job at a smart prep school which prides itself on tradition, discipline and academic success. Dewey shocks the pupils with his don’t care attitude to grades and timetables and he’s on his way to being found out when he discovers the children are musically gifted. He teaches them rock history, swaps the cello for a bass and piano for some prog keyboards and hey presto – he has a band!

In the process of course, he gives them the freedom to express their feelings. The boy who likes Streisand, reads Vogue and is oppressed by his football-mad dad, gets to be the band’s stylist (Jackson Wilks – take a bow; you are superb). The girl who never speaks proves to have a golden singing voice (Milly Greenall – well done!). Zack whose dad wants him to be an academic success so he doesn’t get stuck in a poorly-paid job just wants to be a rock guitarist (Roscoe Davey – devil’s horns to you, sir).

There’s a very moving song from the children in the first act, where they explain the pressure they’re under from parents. If Only You Would Listen is a plea to be seen and heard, and I had a lump in my throat when these diminutive lower school pupils turned to the audience and showed their vulnerability in the song.

The big, catchy number is Stick It to the Man – the rock anthem in which Dewey teaches the kids to break out and rebel.  What do you do when “parents overwork ya” or they’re “all up in your Facebook” or make you eat “gluten-free vegan snack foods”? You “stick it to the man”, the man being your parents, your teacher, your boss… any figure of authority preventing you from being yourself. It was lovely watching the kids let go and leap around the stage. It left everyone smiling and humming the tune in the interval.

Of course, the children aren’t the only ones who are trapped in their lives, needing rock to free them. As the put-upon Ned, Harry Marden has the audience’s sympathy, waiting until his girlfriend Patty (played with confidence by Ruby Hall) is out of the house, before playing Guitar Hero and rocking out on the sofa.

Matilda Shapland plays the head teacher Miss Mullins, who needs to take off her specs and indulge her passion for Stevie Nicks (I loved the little scene as she hums along to Fleetwood Mac on her headphones in her office). Her Queen of the Night aria in the music class was incredible – Matilda has starred in West End musicals and it’s easy to see why from this performance.

There were so many fantastic performances in this show – from the band perched above the stage to the smallest of the performers rocking out front. It’s a big, warm-hearted show about freedom of expression – and Churcher’s totally nailed it.

Well done director and choreographer Stacey Carty, musical director Helen Purchase, production manager Chris Pellet and the many, many backstage crew and enthusiastic cast. You rock!

Kat Wootton

St Ives School grounds given a spring makeover

St Ives School in Haslemere saw children, staff and parents come together for a ground force afternoon last week. They worked together to weed, clear, sweep, plant and decorate the school surroundings and took great pride in adding their own special touch to the grounds of the school.

The afternoon allowed children to work in mixed groups to take responsibility for the upkeep of the school grounds. This was achieved by completing activities such as pebble decorating, planting herbs, sewing wild flower seeds and re-planting hanging baskets. Of course there was a much needed rest mid-way through the afternoon for a drink and a biscuit for the busy bees!

It was fantastic to see the whole school getting stuck in with the community project, (including the Nursery children and staff), as well as children working alongside their friends and relatives to further improve their school surroundings.

St Ives would like to thank Haslemere Garden Centre and Squires Garden Centre for supporting the ground force afternoon.

Colourful show as St Nick’s takes on Joseph

St Nicholas’ School in Church Crookham put on a  colourful performance recently. The senior production was Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat, with music by Andrew Lloyd Webber and lyrics by Tim Rice.

A West End favourite, Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat is a family musical about the trials and triumphs of Joseph, Israel’s favourite son.

With a wonderfully diverse musical score and a cast and crew of nearly 60 pupils, supported by a ten-piece band, this high-energy production was indeed a truly colourful event.  There was a dazzling array of spectacular costumes including, of course, “the coat!”

The show was great fun for all the performers, with music ranging from the Country and Western style of  One more Angel to the rocking 50s Elvis pastiche of Song of the King.

Senior pupils Catherine Harris, who played Joseph, and Charlotte Hutchinson and Jessica Phillips, who were the Narrators, were outstanding in their roles, showing great stamina, vocal quality and stage presence.

Director and Head of Drama Josie Downer said: “Everyone has worked so hard and it is very rewarding seeing the girls put on such a slick and thoroughly professional production.”

Churcher’s Juniors take a look round Number 10

Year 6 at Churcher’s Junior School were lucky enough to see what lies behind the famous black door at Number 10 recently.  The visit to Downing Street was part of their Citizenship Week.

After posing on the front step, the children were welcomed into the Cabinet Room.  The children sat round the famous green table, some even having the opportunity to sit in the Prime Minister’s chair!  They learnt all about some of the important decisions that have affected British life, made and discussed in this historic room.

Next they walked up the Grand Staircase installed by Sir Robert Walpole when he took up residence as Prime Minister in 1735, past portraits of previous Prime Ministers including Churchill, McMillan and Blair.

They then entered the study; a favourite place for Margaret Thatcher and David Cameron to work. Now it hosts the table used for the G8 meeting held in Ireland in 2013; perhaps there is a future world leader in this class?

By entering the White Drawing Room and Terracotta Room, Year 6 joined the many international VIPs that have graced Downing Street.  Here they posed for diplomatic handshakes in front of the White Room’s beautiful  fireplace.

The highlight of the trip for the children, was to see and stroke Larry the cat who was sleeping on the window sill in the hallway.  As the resident mouser, he certainly looked happy and well fed.

Mrs Sarah Roberts, class teacher said: “It was a remarkable experience for us all.  We have been studying the power of democracy and parliament and to visit this place so entwined with British government and British history was a very memorable experience.  I was very proud of my class, whose behaviour was excellent.”

Churcher’s pupils STEAM in to Southampton for art day

The Year 4 children from Churcher’s College Junior School visited Southampton Art Gallery this week as part of their STEAM week work.

After a brief gallery tour they enjoyed a workshop with Jo, one of the museum’s resident artists. She gently guided the children through making a Medusa head out of clay- complete with writhing snakes for hair. This activity linked in with the work they have been doing this term in History on the Ancient Greeks.

With this in mind, the pupils were very anxious to see the Perseus room at the gallery, which exhibits 12 enormous paintings by Edward Burne-Jones depicting the famous legend. This trip is always fun and worthwhile and for many, it is their very first experience of an Art Gallery.

Annual U-11 football tournament hosted by Churcher’s Juniors

Churcher’s College Junior School hosted their annual U11 7 a-side Football Tournament and with 11 teams taking part the stage was set for a fantastic event – it didn’t disappoint!

With a total of 55 matches being played in a round robin format, the podium placed teams changed on regular occasion and going into the final round there were 4 teams in contention for the win.In the end it came down to the CCJS A Team beating Alton School in their final match to confirm Prince’s Mead as the overall winners with Churcher’s in second place and St Edmunds in third.

Churcher’s A team turned up ready to play a tough tournament but one that they knew they could win, having beaten almost every other team recently. The first match was against PGS and we came through well with a win, then came Oakwood where we experienced our first loss. As the games came through we went through a rollercoaster of emotions and results, winning or drawing most of our games we weren’t making our lives easy. Then came Churcher’s B, rivals and classmates all on the same pitch, it was going to be a good game and it didn’t disappoint, although under a huge amount of pressure Churcher’s B defended in numbers and defended well, with Churcher’s A unable to fine the net it ended 0-0. After a final few games Churcher’s A had given it everything, and due to earlier results, they now were reliant on other results elsewhere.

With the games ended it was up to Mr Forbes to announce the results, as the other teams were announced it came down to two and Churcher’s A had achieved a well-deserved second place. Well done to all the teams who took part.