Churcher’s pupils STEAM in to Southampton for art day

The Year 4 children from Churcher’s College Junior School visited Southampton Art Gallery this week as part of their STEAM week work.

After a brief gallery tour they enjoyed a workshop with Jo, one of the museum’s resident artists. She gently guided the children through making a Medusa head out of clay- complete with writhing snakes for hair. This activity linked in with the work they have been doing this term in History on the Ancient Greeks.

With this in mind, the pupils were very anxious to see the Perseus room at the gallery, which exhibits 12 enormous paintings by Edward Burne-Jones depicting the famous legend. This trip is always fun and worthwhile and for many, it is their very first experience of an Art Gallery.

Annual U-11 football tournament hosted by Churcher’s Juniors

Churcher’s College Junior School hosted their annual U11 7 a-side Football Tournament and with 11 teams taking part the stage was set for a fantastic event – it didn’t disappoint!

With a total of 55 matches being played in a round robin format, the podium placed teams changed on regular occasion and going into the final round there were 4 teams in contention for the win.In the end it came down to the CCJS A Team beating Alton School in their final match to confirm Prince’s Mead as the overall winners with Churcher’s in second place and St Edmunds in third.

Churcher’s A team turned up ready to play a tough tournament but one that they knew they could win, having beaten almost every other team recently. The first match was against PGS and we came through well with a win, then came Oakwood where we experienced our first loss. As the games came through we went through a rollercoaster of emotions and results, winning or drawing most of our games we weren’t making our lives easy. Then came Churcher’s B, rivals and classmates all on the same pitch, it was going to be a good game and it didn’t disappoint, although under a huge amount of pressure Churcher’s B defended in numbers and defended well, with Churcher’s A unable to fine the net it ended 0-0. After a final few games Churcher’s A had given it everything, and due to earlier results, they now were reliant on other results elsewhere.

With the games ended it was up to Mr Forbes to announce the results, as the other teams were announced it came down to two and Churcher’s A had achieved a well-deserved second place. Well done to all the teams who took part.

St Ives school shortlisted for TES award

St Ives school shortlisted for TES award

St Ives School in Haslemere has been shortlisted for the independent pre-prep/prep school of the year award at the prestigious 2018 Tes Independent School Awards.

“This is a huge accolade as we are one of only eight schools nominated, with competition from some of the finest and most respected of the country’s 620 independent prep schools,” said head teacher Mrs Kay Goldsworthy.

“The nomination recognises the success of St Ives, not only in academic achievement but also innovation, imagination and efforts to develop children in ways that go beyond the league tables.

“We are of course extremely proud of the high academic standards of our pupils, in a non-selective environment, but we recognise that this represents only part of developing the whole child. The breadth of wider experiences offered at St Ives allows all our children to develop as individuals, to grow a general life-long love of learning and to naturally achieve and progress. This was evident in 50% scholarships to senior schools, 34 distinctions and five merits in Verse & Prose / Acting exams, qualification for the IAPS swimming and coming second in the National United Ideas invention competition.”

Ann Mroz, Editor of Tes (formerly known as the Times Educational Supplement), said: “Independent education in this country is world class. It’s one of Britain’s great success stories. And those shortlisted for the TES Independent School Awards are the cream of the crop. This year we had more entries than ever, the standard was the best yet and the competition fiercer than ever before.  To be shortlisted is an extraordinary achievement.”

St Ives Chair of Governors, Graham Harvey-Browne, said: “We are delighted and very proud to hear this wonderful news.  This is a testament to the dedication and hard work of Mrs Goldsworthy, Miss Smith and all of the teaching and support staff at St Ives, and is a clear indicator of the continued success of the school in producing well-rounded young people who are inspired and supported in achieving their potential.”

St Ives’ broad curriculum is enriched and enhanced by an array of activities and events which have provided good reason for nomination for this award; its Forest School, educational visits, focus on local community and whole school charity days are just a few examples of how it aims to broaden the perspective of pupils and develop the whole child.

Mrs Goldsworthy added: “At St Ives we provide opportunities for each child to discover, develop and showcase their individual interests and talents whether that be in music, art, sport or other areas. In this way, we provide a truly nurturing and inspiring environment.”

St Ives School, Three Gates Lane, Haslemere

01428 643734

stiveshaslemere.com

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Do the maths – Alton College students can!

Lucy Bayliss, previously at Amery Hill School and Sara Garanito, previously at Calthorpe Park School took part in this year’s Mathematical Olympiad for Girls. Over 1700 girls nationwide participated, with the top 25% receiving a Certificate of Distinction. The Mathematical Olympiad for Girls is an event run by the UK Mathematics Trust, introduced in 2011 to help schools and college nurture the talent of enthusiastic young female mathematicians. Sara received a Certificate of Participation and Lucy a Certificate of Distinction getting 10/10 for one of the questions (*below).

100 Maths students recently competed in the Senior Maths Challenge with nine achieving a gold award, 31 a silver award and 29 a bronze. Roughly 55,000 students nationally took the Challenge this year, a significant drop on previous years, but there was an increase in participants from Alton College. The Senior Maths Challenge consists of 25 very difficult non-calculator multiple-choice maths questions to be completed in 90 minutes. Students start with 25 marks, get four marks for each correct answer and lose one mark for each incorrect answer, to discourage guessing. See http://www.ukmt.org.uk/individual-competitions/senior-challenge/ for more information about the Challenge, along with the paper and solutions.

Pictured left to right: Lucy Bayliss, Dr Dave Lynch Curriculum Manager for Maths, Sara Garanito

The College’s top scorer was PeterMorris, previously at Eggar’s School; he scored 109 out of 125 which means he goes through to the British Maths Olympiad Round 1 (BMO1). Only the top 1,000 students in the country qualify for the BMO1. A further nine students have got through to the Senior Kangaroo (SK) round, which involves the next 6,000 best students, who don’t qualify for the BMO1.
They are:
Harry Buchanan, previously at Perins School
Lucy Bayliss, previously at Amery Hill School
James Dedman, previously home educated
Marco Li, previously educated overseas
Cameron Neasom, previously at Bohunt School
Rebekah Aspinwall, previously at Amery Hill School
Sam Bishop, previously at St Edmund’s School
James Macmillan Clyne, previously at Bohunt School
Joe Parry, previously at The Petersfield School
Three examples of this year’s challenge are (an easy, medium and hard question):
Q2:  Last year, an earthworm from Wigan named Dave wriggled into the record books as the largest found in the UK.
Dave was 40cm long and had a mass of 26g. What was Dave’s mass per unit length?
A: 0.6 g/cm       B: 0.65 g/cm      C: 0.75 g/cm      D: 1.6 g/cm       E: 1.75 g/cm

 

Q11:  The teenagers Sam and Jo notice the following facts about their ages:
The difference between the squares of their ages is four times the sum of their ages.
The sum of their ages is eight times the difference between their ages.
What is the age of the older of the two?
A: 15                 B: 16                 C: 17                  D: 18                 E: 19

Q24:  There is a set of straight lines in a plane such that each line intersects exactly ten others.
Which of the following could not be the number of lines in that set?
A: 11                 B: 12                 C: 15                  D: 16                 E: 20

Answers are B, D and D.

The question Lucy got totally correct:
Let n be an odd integer greater than 3 and let M = n2 + 2n − 7.
Prove that, for all such n, at least four different positive integers (excluding 1 and M) divide M exactly.

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Music masterclass at King Edward’s Witley

Pupils at King Edward’s Witley were treated to an exceptional learning opportunity when Alexandra Vaduva, the celebrated pianist, delivered a music masterclass to pupils in Years 9-11. The inspiring coaching, followed by a short recital to students and staff, was made possible by the generosity of The Countess of Munster Musical Trust, founded by The Countess of Munster, a concert pianist herself, to support young musicians of professional calibre to achieve their aims.

Romanian-born Miss Vaduva started playing the piano at the age of four and has performed all over the world, winning numerous accolades, including first prize at the ‘Vienna International’, ‘Pro Piano’ and ‘Carl Filtsch’ International piano competitions. After completing a Bachelor of Music, Master of Arts and Advanced Diploma courses at the Royal Academy of Music Miss Vaduva is now studying for a PhD there. After spending time sharing her skills and knowledge with the pupils, Miss Vaduva’s recital, which took place in the School’s Recital Room, included Kinderszenen by Schumann; two sonatas by Scarlatti and a Suite by Bartók and concluded with Beethoven’s Moonlight Sonata.

Commenting on the special occasion, Stasio Sliwka, King Edward’s Director of Music, said: “It has been a huge privilege for our pupils to be afforded the opportunity to spend time with the incredibly talented Miss Vaduva, and indeed for the whole school to have the chance to attend such a rousing performance. The school enjoys a special relationship with The Countess of Munster Musical Trust, as the Countess kindly financed the building of our Music School which bears her name, and which she personally opened on 29 May 1963. Music has always played a central role in school life at King Edward’s and we remain committed to offering musical tuition of the highest calibre to enable our pupils to maximise their potential. As a result, we regularly welcome talented professionals to inspire our pupils with their talents – indeed the first performance in our Recital Room more than 50 years ago was given by world-class violinist Yehudi Menuhin accompanied by his pianist sister Hephzibah.”

Alexandra Vaduva with King Edward’s pupils at the Masterclass

 

Remember, remember hedgehogs in November

With fireworks night on the horizon, Surrey Wildlife Trust is appealing to all bonfire builders to think about hibernating hedgehogs when constructing and lighting their wood piles. Unfortunately bonfire night coincides with the season when small mammals are looking for cosy places to hide, which can be disastrous.

Picture by Jon Hawkins

“A stack of dry wood and leaves piled up for a bonfire might look to a hedgehog like the perfect place to overwinter and sadly we fear many animals do perish in fires every year,” said Dawn Fielding, the Trust’s Wildlife Gardening Officer.

“Gardeners love these adorable prickly creatures, as they eat bugs and slugs and are great for natural pest control. But hedgehogs are undergoing an unprecedented decline, with some experts recently warning of possible extinction within ten years! So it’s vitally important we all do what we can to protect them.”

The Trust wants bonfire night to be a safe night for all concerned – but especially hedgehogs. So it’s put together these top tips to help protect these prickly visitors:

  • Consider piling material near the site of your fire and building your bonfire just before lighting. This will give small creatures less chance to move in.
  • Check your bonfire carefully before setting it on fire and remove any small inhabitants – rehome in a safe area away from dogs or cats, such as under a hedge or large bush and well away from your bonfire.
  • If you do have to build your bonfire beforehand, consider constructing a fence around it made of chicken wire, to help deter any mammals looking for a cosy home.

Hedgehogs were voted as the UK’s national species in 2013 but since the 1950s their numbers have seen a startling 95% decline. They’re disappearing from our landscape as fast as tigers are worldwide and there are thought to be fewer than a million left in the UK.

The declining quality of hedgerows, over-management of parks and the loss of gardens to paving and decking have been partly to blame for the hedgehog’s decline. The increased use of chemicals in gardening and farming means there are fewer insects, slugs and snails for hedgehogs to eat.

Surrey Wildlife Trust is working to improve habitats for hedgehogs and trying to raise awareness of their plight. It’s launched a new ‘Adopt A Hedgehog’ pack to help support conservation work, which includes an adorable cuddly toy hedgehog, official adoption certificate and a fact sheet for £25.

The Trust has also set up a Hedgehog Hotspots campaign to survey numbers of hedgehogs in the county. Animal lovers are asked to keep an eye out for the prickly mammals and report their findings on the Trust’s website, which is hosting a map of recent sightings.

Adult hedgehogs travel up to two kilometres a night hunting for food and they need to be able to move between gardens and green spaces.  You can help them by cutting a hedgehog-sized hole in your garden fence.  Or why not build your own hedgehog house out of a wooden box or pile of logs or sticks with some warm dry straw or leaves inside?

Please don’t put bread and milk out for hedgehogs; you can make them very sick this way as they cannot digest lactose. Cat food is ideal if you want to treat them, and help little ones put on weight ready for hibernation.

The Trust is also working to conserve and create habitat for hedgehogs with its new ‘Hedgerow Heroes’ citizen science project. Volunteers are needed to help survey, monitor and conserve hedgerows and plant new ones. Why not help hedgehogs where you live by signing up as a volunteer?

For more information about all the Trust’s work to help hedgehogs, including Hedgehog AdoptionsHedgerow Heroes and Hedgehog Hotspots, visit www.surreywildlifetrust.org.

First Churcher’s Junior football festival

The first Churcher’s College Junior School U7 football festival took place in October.

With an emphasis on fun and participation, 60 children took part in 45 matches over the course of the afternoon.  Each team played nine games and everyone enjoyed the opportunity to play teams from The Royal school and Brookham.  Everybody was thoroughly exhausted at the end and shared a match tea to end the afternoon.

 

Butser Ancient Farm near Petersfield is proud to reopen the Roman villa after a major restoration project over the summer. It’s 14 years since the villa was completed for the TV documentary Rebuilding the Past in 2003. Since then it’s been seen by around half a million people when they visit Butser Ancient Farm.

The renovated Roman villa at Butser Ancient Farm, Chalton

 

The newly whitewashed interiors have made the rooms brighter and the floors have been re-laid with opus signinum (Roman concrete) inlaid, in the Roman tradition, with broken pottery. These are real fragments of Romano-British pottery, giving a fantastic new touchstone to the past for Roman-themed visits.

The building is based on original excavations of a Roman villa at Sparsholt, near Winchester, and more than 30,000 school children and 7,000 members of the public come to visit every year.

Over this weekend, visitors will have the chance to join a short guided tour of the villa and discover how people lived in Britain 1600 years ago.

Maureen Page, one of the Directors at Butser Ancient Farm, is delighted with the results, “This has given the villa a new lease of life. It is now accessible to disabled visitors and it means that we can prepare for next year when we are planning to paint frescos on the villa walls and lay mosaics on the floors.”

Butser Ancient Farm www.butserancientfarm.co.uk  02392 598838

School reveals rich history at Heritage Open Days

King Edward’s Witley opened its doors to the general public last weekend to share its rich history with visitors, as part of the established national Heritage Open Days initiative. The event marked the first time the school has taken part in England’s favourite heritage festival and was particularly apposite given this year’s focus on the 150th anniversary of the school’s move to Witley.

Led by the School’s Archivist, Marilyn Wilkes, around 40 people took part in two tours on Sunday, September 10, providing a unique opportunity for visitors to behold the local landmark architecture as well as the imposing Bridewell and Selborne Rooms, which both house original paintings of historic interest. The Bridewell Room, part of the original 1867 complex of buildings housing the Schoolis used for receptions, Governors’ meetings and meetings of the School’s pupil council. The Selborne Room – originally built in 1876 as the Dining Hall –  was named after the 4th Earl of Selborne, (Treasurer of Bridewell Royal Hospital from 1972 to 1983) and is now used for exams, conferences, seminars and other functions.  Guests also had a private view of Charter Hall, the scene for all school productions and awards ceremonies, which was formally opened by the President of Bridewell Royal Hospital, HM Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother, in 1958,  and which houses the original and enormous 17th Century Charter Portrait.

Other highlights of the tour included the beautiful on-site Chapel, first consecrated in 1868; the School’s own museum which houses numerous original artefacts and photographs (including a real hammock used by boarders until the 1940s); the War Memorial erected in honour of the Masters and former pupils who fell in the 1914-1918 war; and the statue of the young King Edward VI, who originally granted his palace at Bridewell, on the banks of the Thames, to the Lord Mayor of London, creating the School’s parent foundation (Bridewell Royal Hospital), as a place for the training and education of poor children in 1553.

Throughout the tours, Mrs Wilkes, provided a potted history of King Edward’s Witley, from its original origins as a Tudor orphanage in the City of London through to the world-class school it is today.

Mrs Wilkes said: “We are immensely proud of King Edward’s long history and it was wonderful to provide our visitors with an understanding of the School’s exceptional heritage. Even for those living locally, many were surprised at the size of the school behind the road-side façade and all enjoyed hearing about the fascinating journey from 1553 to the current day.”

 

Starry year for Churcher’s sixth form

Churcher’s College sixth form in Petersfield is celebrating yet another starry A level results year.

Headmaster Simon Williams said: “After the quite exceptional levels of success last year we had expected this year to be a little more modest but we are absolutely delighted to note how this year’s group of students have exceeded expectations.

“Durham University and their Centre for Evaluation and Monitoring use various baseline tests to give us a prediction of the A level outcome for the students and, from that, as a year group as a whole. The Sixth Formers here at Churcher’s have exceeded those expectations of them; our value-added score last year was outstanding; it is likely to be similar again this year.

“For the majority of our students, university is the next destination and it is the top, most competitive courses and universities they aspire to. The confirmation of places is still coming in, but with 18% of the A levels graded A* and over 45% A* and A grade, the level of A level success here means that they invariably achieve their aspirations. To be awarded an A* grade candidates must achieve a cumulative score of 90% or more, and with fifteen, of the year group of just over 100, achieve straight A* and A grades there have been many quite outstanding performances but it is not just the academically highly capable who have exceeded expectations.

“With all the changes that have been taking place with A levels, linking one year with another becomes like comparing apples and pears. There has always been a natural variation in ability between year groups but this is being exacerbated by exam structure changes such as no re-take opportunities and the loss of modular exams. What doesn’t change, however, is the Churcher’s students’ determination to give and get the best, inside and outside the classroom.

“Those of us who were lucky enough to witness the Churcher’s orchestra tour’s hugely successful concerts on their tour in Barcelona this summer heard applause aplenty; and there is another, well-deserved, standing ovation for these A level exam results.”

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