Cynthia will smash it at Write Angle poetry night

Be prepared for the very highly commended poet, Cynthia Hamilton, at September’s Write Angle in Petersfield.

Cynthia is a comic performance artist who began while still at the University in Liverpool. She became the Allcomers Slam Champion at the Cheltenham Festival of Literature and went on to perform for BBC-TV, Channel 4 and Central Television.

Performance poet Cynthia Hamilton

She’s had poems published by Poetry Review and has performed with John Hegley, Stewart Lee and John Cooper Clarke – who described her as “metrically sound” – and she’s also the proud author of one of Benjamin Zephaniah’s favourite love poems. In addition she has done work for the BBC World Service and was published in The Bloomsbury Book of Love Poems, The Penguin Book of New Black Writing in Britain and Moving Voices: Black Performance Poetry. She’s also had two plays produced by Radio 4. 

In addition to performing, Cynthia currently works in publishing where she likes to “mix things up”. She has promoted books for authors from the Archbishop of Canterbury to Frank Bruno and knows a surprising amount about the lesbian witchcraft book market…

Write Angle poetry and music cabaret is on Tuesday, September 18, at 7.30pm, at the Townhouse, 28 High Street, Petersfield.

Admission costs £6 and there will be the usual open mic spot for anyone who wants to share their work with an enthusiastic audience. 

See www.petersfieldwriteangle.co.uk

Haslemere Remembers – a festival of flowers to commemorate centenary

To add to the poignant poppy cascade on the outside of St Chrisopher’s Church, Haslemere, the inside of the church will have more than 20 floral arrangements created by local community groups from all over the area, in Haslemere Remembers – a Festival of Flowers, September 15-16, 10am-5pm.
All the arrangements, tributes and installations, inspired by World War 1 poems and songs, will include a giant poppy wreath hanging over the nave of the church and a memorial tomb naming all the men from the Haslemere area who lost their lives during the Great War.
Admission is free and all donations will be given to the Royal British Legion.

St Christopher’s Church, Haslemere

Free heritage day at Waverley Abbey House

Every year in September, thousands of hidden, historic places open their doors to the public for free during the Heritage Open Day event, to celebrate their fantastic history, architecture and culture.
This year the main theme is Extraordinary Women, so why not take this chance to explore who the women were who left their mark on Waverley Abbey House, which will be open on Saturday, September 8, 10am-4pm.
Learn about the house’s rich history, dating back to the reign of King George I, discover the remarkable role that Waverley played during the First World War, and walk in the footsteps of some famous visitors.
Free guided tours of the house will take place throughout the day and a history display will be available on the first floor (accessible by stairs only).
The café will be open for homemade light lunches, cakes and refreshments.
No booking is necessary but for any enquiries, please call 01252 784733 or email info@waverleyabbeyhouse.org.uk


https://www.waverleyabbeyhouse.org.uk/

New networking group for Petersfield

Fabulous Networking, the Collaborative Business Community, launches in Petersfield on Friday, September 21. With more than 30 groups in the South East, Fabulous Networking’s monthly meetings are structured but informal, with networking, an exchange of business cards, a 60-second pitch, and a speaker.

The leader of this local group is Nick Keith, founder of Life in Petersfield. “I can assure everyone a warm welcome to this special network, which thrives on ‘Netwinning’ – collaboration, inspiration and support,” he said.

To discover more and register, go to: https://fabulous-women.co.uk/event/detail_3070

Explosive dialogue as Frayn trains his searchlight on scientists at war

REVIEW

Copenhagen, by Michael Frayn

 Minerva Theatre, Chichester

Ten years have passed since Michael Frayn’s cerebral play ‘Copenhagen’ made its debut at the National Theatre. This marks the playwright’s take on a famous meeting in 1941 between two of the world’s leading physicists, Werner Heisenberg from Germany and his one-time mentor Nils Bohr from Denmark. “Exactly what happened, and what Heisenberg’s intentions were, have been endlessly disputed,” Frayn notes in the programme.

The third protagonist is Bohr’s wife Margarethe (Patricia Hodge), a vital witness to events as her husband’s secretary who had to transcribe his many drafts and re-drafts when he was preparing a scientific paper. The three of them are all dead and, from their heavenly vantage point, they set out to offer various scenarios of what was said and what happened at the meeting, with some ‘live’ reconstructions.

Copenhagen by Michael Frayn at CFT

Heisenberg  (Charles Edwards) was half-Jewish but he was roundly condemned after the War because of his perceived Nazi sympathies, and because of the suspicion that his visit to Copenhagen was to wheedle information out of Bohr about making an atomic bomb and to discover how far the Allies had got with their research. But that is shrouded in mystery in Frayn’s telling of the story, as he lets Heisenberg tell his side of things, for which he was criticized when the play went to New York.

In Frayn’s account the meeting between the two men starts amiably (although Margarethe is more suspicious), but quickly provokes a rupture. Bohr (Paul Jesson) was Heisenberg’s mentor when they worked together between 1924 and 1927 and is referred to as ‘the Pope’ by his German protégé. “If I am the Pope, then Einstein is God,” jokes Bohr.

It is a remarkable coup de theatre that Frayn’s dialogue fizzes with intensity and interest in long discussions over electrons, photons, neutrons, Quantum mechanics, fission, reactors and chain reactions. Heisenberg never says openly what he wants, but the dark shadow of the war hangs over their discussions, and he hints that his role has been to hide the weapons of mass destruction from the Nazis. At the same time he expresses his love of Germany where he and his children have been born and raised and have prospered.

His Danish hosts try hard to get Heisenberg to say what he wants but his line remains that producing an atomic bomb would have been too difficult. And he insists that his goal is to build nuclear reactors to create energy. The two men often return to discussions of mutual sporting pursuits in sailing, table tennis and skiing. Heisenberg was proud to be a fast and fearless skier and based his scientific methodology on his fast instincts, while Bohr was more careful. Sailing brings bad memories for the Bohrs as their son was drowned at sea.

The discussions take place against a bare set with only three wooden chairs, but the stage is filled with fine words, and subtle activity as the two men pace round in memory of their frequent walks. The dialogue never flags and Margarethe often raises a laugh as she gently (or firmly) contradicts the two men for their false memories and scientific contradictions. Frayn explores dilemmas for scientists when their nations are at war and lucidly explains the scientific challenges of producing a nuclear weapon. If Germany had won the race to create the Atom bomb, who knows what would have happened.

The actors maintain a fast and furious pace and, for me, the diction was clear (although I heard one theatregoer complain that Jesson had mumbled in the first act). There is crisp direction from Michael Blakemore whose long experience has included directing ‘Noises Off’, Frayn’s famous and enduring farce, and the original production of ‘Copenhagen’ during his time at the National Theatre. There is theoretical and actual  explosive material in this production which merits five stars.

www.cft.org

 Nick Keith