Perfect night of pop folk at G Live

REVIEW

Amy Macdonald and guests

G Live, Guildford

Monday, October 30

G Live offered the perfect setting for a night of pop folk from Amy Macdonald and special guests.

The stage and lighting were expertly set with a variety of instruments on display, including a wide range of styles and sizes of guitars.

Holiday Oscar opened the show as Amy’s support and won the crowd over immediately with his charismatic humour and modest gratitude towards the audience, claiming it was the biggest crowd he had ever performed to. Holiday played his acoustic guitar with ease and actually dedicated one of his folk tunes to his school guitar teacher.

Holiday reflects on ‘first world problems’ in his music with simple but effective lyrics covering topics such as constantly checking your phone, which brought laughs from around the room. He also delivered a fantastic cover of Leonard Cohen’s Chelsea Hotel #2.

An interval followed, before Amy Macdonald took to the stage in a cool, relaxed outfit of ripped jeans, a black t-shirt and boots and a sleeve of tattoos. She was greeted warmly by the audience and went straight into her first song. Her stripped back set was supported by three fabulous musicians who seemed to be able to play every type of instrument from the double bass to the banjo. All three were incredibly professional, with smooth changeovers aided by the G Live staff.

Amy’s voice was astounding; a beautiful, distinct, folky tone that was powerful and heartfelt throughout, offering both slow tracks as well as upbeat tunes that had the audience on their feet.

She was charming and funny in between songs, giving background information to the music and her career history as well as having a few laughs and also complimented G Live, claiming that it was “lovely behind stage” and that it was “so good to perform in a nice, clean venue”.

The whole room got to their feet as the show ended, demanding an encore from an obliging Amy and her musicians.

This was a fantastic evening of entertainment, proving that there is more to modern music than just pop and rap.

Alex Ashbee